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Hood Politics

Judging by the works they created, a vast number of things: memories of their homes, loss of their loved ones, the unspeakable conditions in Terezin, the inhumanity of the Nazis, their need to process what was happening to them, the creative impulse that could not be extinguished.

And the hope that one day, people would read their words and view their art, and learn the dark truth of Terezin. Years later, people did just that.

And in , I became one of them. His poem inspired me to learn all I could about the artists and children of Terezin and to journey to the camp in January I saw the sodden, bare trees and a handful of residents making their way along the mostly empty streets.

I wondered if they ever thought of the many thousands of people who were once imprisoned there or if their daily lives distracted them from thoughts of the past.

I visited the Ghetto Museum in the main square, which displayed writings, drawings and photographs of some of the prisoners. I saw that the museum was deserted, and that Terezin had very few visitors that day.

That was the day I decided that I would have to be the one to share their stories somehow, and to this end I have started a blog and written the manuscript of a novel.

Tara Malone is a professional blogger and Holocaust educator. Her blog, Butterflies in the Ghetto , features biographies of the many creative individuals who were imprisoned in Terezin and provides resources and support to teachers.

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Images Greyscale. Vera refused his proposal several times, feeling that her first responsibility was to care for her mother.

She hoped she would be able to keep her mother alive until the end of the war and then bring her to a sanatorium.

Later that year, Vera agreed to marry Arthur. They married in the camp on March 6, , and the Chief Rabbi of Denmark officiated the wedding.

The couple stood under a chuppah made of sticks and a torn blanket, and since there was no wine, they sipped from a cup of black coffee. Arthur even managed to arrange for a Danish violinist named Hambro to attend and serenade the newlyweds.

Even though they were now married, they still had to live apart. The couple survived the war in Terezin, which was liberated by the Russian army on May 8, Arthur and Vera separated for a time after the war.

But the memories of her lost parents and sister haunted Vera, and she moved to a small room near the university.

She also tirelessly worked to find other members of her extended family. Tragically, Vera eventually learned that all her relatives had died in the Holocaust, and she was the only survivor.

Soon after returning to Prague, Vera enrolled in the university, hoping to resume her dream of becoming a doctor. But she struggled with poor health after being in Terezin, which made attending school difficult.

Vera later reunited with Arthur, and the couple emigrated to Israel in with their young son David. Vera took a job working with newborns in the Rambam hospital, and Arthur started a career as a pharmacist.

They later lived in a kibbutz, where their second son Michael was born. Eventually, they moved to a town called Nahariya.

Vera has many good memories of their time there. During the years in Nahariya, Vera worked in an outpatient clinic while earning her degree in medical technology.

Both Arthur and Vera continued to work in the medical field until Vera retired in She began visiting schools across Canada and wrote five books documenting her experiences.

Vera also had a powerful desire to share the stories of people she knew in Terezin. She wanted the world to know the stories of the people behind the numbers, the ones who lived and died in Terezin.

Vera continued this work after Arthur passed away in , and earned an honorary doctorate from the University of New Brunswick, Saint John.

Now, 94, Vera continues to live in Toronto and still tirelessly promotes Holocaust education. Above all, Vera wants people to remember that those who died in the Holocaust are more than victims, that we need to know about their acts of defiance, their courage, and their struggles to maintain their humanity in the face of the some of the most inhumane circumstances the world has ever known.

Lost to the Shoah: Eight Lives. Helga Weiss was a young Terezin artist whose story has become known in the past few years with the publication of her diary.

Helga created dozens of paintings that you can choose from. I recommend choosing from the selection of her paintings profiled on The Guardian.

Here are some of the ones I suggest showing your students:. You can project the image in front of the class, or you could hand out copies of the paintings to your students.

A large color image is best so students can see the color of the paints Helga used. Give your students the chance to take a long look at each painting and to note the details.

Encourage them to notice the colors, the shapes, what the people in the painting are doing, and the expressions on their faces. Ask them what they observe, and write down the observations on the classroom whiteboard.

At this point, the class should just observe the details, not interpret or analyze anything. Ask your students what questions they have about the painting.

Give them a few minutes to write down as many questions as they can. Once the time is up, divide your class into small groups and instruct them to come up with some answers to their questions.

Now ask your students to think about the artist herself. How old is she, and why is she painting scenes of life in the Terezin ghetto?

What was it like for her to live in the ghetto? Who is her audience, and why is she painting for them? Have the students write down their thoughts and ask for volunteers to share with the class.

Tell them how she and her mother were separated from her father, and how she decided to send her father a painting to cheer him up.

She painted a happy scene of two children building a snowman, but her father surprised her with his reaction. Ask your students to think about why her father wanted her to record life in the ghetto.

Now have them look at the painting again and draw their attention to specific details. Emphasize that each detail is depicting something that the artist Helga actually observed in Terezin.

Ask them to put themselves in the scene and to imagine it unfolding around them. How does it make them feel? How do they think Helga would have felt as she drew the scene?

A big part of teaching the Holocaust effectively is presenting it in a way that students can engage with, and helping them feel a personal connection with someone who experienced it.

It is December , and in her barrack, a twelve-year-old girl paints a cheerful picture of two children building a snowman. For weeks they have been confined to this ghetto.

Worst of all, this girl has been separated from her father. From that day on, this young girl draws what she observes around her, scenes of daily life in the Terezin ghetto.

By doing so, she chronicles the truth of Terezin. Until recently, she lived in Prague with her parents Irena, a seamstress, and Otto, who worked at the state bank of Prague.

After the Nazis came to power, Otto lost his job and the family struggled to make ends meet. Helga had to leave school and continue her studies privately with other Jewish children.

The Jews of Prague lost more and more rights and then were deported from their homes. Helga and her parents arrived in Terezin in December Helga kept a diary of life in the camp and created countless drawings and paintings of what she saw around her.

She painted her parents in their apartment in Prague taking an inventory of their possessions, which they had to hand over to the Nazis. People often received a summons at night, and the girl sits in her bunk in the dark, awakened by a flashlight shining on her.

In her diary, she wrote about a performance organized by some of the girls in her barrack. Helga and the other girls sang together, performed a short play, and experienced a rare moment of beauty in the ghetto.

With tears in her eyes and her mind filled with images of her home, Helga realized that for a fleeting moment they were free.

Helga witnessed the exponential growth of the camp population, the endless transports, and the Red Cross visit in the summer of After the visit, the terrifying transports east started again.

One of the most tragic and haunting moments in the diary is when Helga and her father said good-bye. She hugged her father close, resting her head on his chest so she could hear his heart beating.

He tried to smile, but his mouth was trembling and all he could manage was a kind of grimace. Helga called out to him, but then she lost sight of him in the crowd.

Helga and her mother barely had time to grieve before they were assigned to a transport. Before they left, Helga gave her diary and her drawings to her uncle, who hid them behind a wall in one of the Terezin barracks.

At fifteen, Helga realized she should lie about her age during the selection. She insisted she was eighteen and survived the selection. After ten days in Auschwitz, Helga and her mother were sent to Freiberg, Germany to work in an airplane factory.

They worked in the unheated factory for twelve-hour shifts, with very little to eat or drink, and had to endure endless roll calls and the abuse of the guards.

As the Allies drew near, Helga and her mother were sent by rail to the camp Mauthausen, which took sixteen days. They were crammed into the train cars and endured days without food or water.

As the train inched forward, they heard ear-shattering explosions from air raids and saw trainloads of wounded soldiers. By the time they arrived at Mauthausen, Helga and the other women had become emaciated, almost beyond recognition.

The conditions at Mauthausen were terrible, with food shortages, filthy, overcrowded bunks, and diseases like typhus were rampant.

Incredibly, Helga and her mother survived, and were liberated by the Allies on May 5th, The two women made their way back to Prague, and ultimately managed to get their apartment back.

But Helga and her mother Irena were never able to find out the truth about what happened to him. Most of their other relatives and friends never returned from the camps either.

Despite their grief, Helga and her mother knew they had to go on and build a new life for themselves. Helga enrolled at the Academy of Fine Arts in Prague and began a long, successful career as a professional artist.

They had two children, and later, grandchildren. The artistic tradition continued into the next generations. The family remained in Prague, where Helga and her husband struggled as artists during the Communist era.

For many years, Helga was unable to share her story. After the war, she found that no one wanted to know what had happened to the Jews of Prague.

In the s Helga published excerpts from her diary for the first time in a book about Terezin. Helga reflected that when she returned to her diary, she had so much more to express, more truths that she needed to share with the world.

She ultimately began to expand on it and edit it for publication. Through her paintings and recently published diary, Helga has revealed the truth of Terezin to the world.

These are some additional Holocaust teaching resources for middle schoolers that I consider to be extremely valuable. Each story had a profound impact on me and I believe they are a powerful way to help middle school students learn about the Holocaust.

Both the book and the documentary are appropriate for older middle school and high school students. Gerda was born in in Bielitz, Poland and lived a comfortable life with her parents and brother, Arthur.

After the Nazi invasion in , Gerda and her family had to move to the basement of their home and were later separated and sent to labor camps.

During the war, Gerda loses everything: her home, her family, possessions, and her friends. She is eventually forced on a death march in the winter of , and incredibly she survives the horrible journey.

Gerda later married an American soldier named Kurt Klein, relocated to the United States, and had a family. She is the author of five books, has shared her story with audiences for forty-five years, and has earned many awards and accolades.

The Personal Histories section features videotaped survivor testimonies, while the Behind Every Name a Story web project has essays written by survivors.

There are also diaries, podcasts featuring Holocaust survivors, and much more. With all the testimonies available, you should certainly be able to find some to use in your classroom.

The two girls bonded as young children when they were new immigrants in the Netherlands. Anne mentions Hannah several times in her diary, though she calls her by the pseudonym Lies Goosen.

Some of the most heartbreaking passages in the diary took place after Anne dreamt of her friend in the winter of In her dream, Hannah appeared, emaciated, dressed in rags and in despair.

She asks why Anne has abandoned her, and the question haunts Anne. The terrible irony is that Anne died, while Hannah survived the war in Bergen-Belsen, along with her little sister, Gaby.

Hannah and Anne had a brief, emotional reunion in Bergen-Belsen. Sadly, they were unable to see each other over the tall fence that divided them.

Anne told Hannah of the desperate conditions she was living in. Later, Hannah managed to toss a package of food over the fence for Anne.

She and her sister Gaby later emigrated to Israel, where they began a new life. Hannah married, had three children and many grandchildren, and still lives in Israel today.

Nanette, her parents, and her brother were deported from Amsterdam and sent to the transit camp Westerbork. From there, they were sent to Bergen-Belsen in February A year later, Nanette was left orphaned and alone in the camp.

Around this time she had a remarkable, emotional reunion with Anne Frank. During their encounters, the girls shared their sorrows and suffering.

Incredibly, they also managed to speak about their dreams for the future. Anne told Nanette about her diary and said she still hoped to publish it after the war.

Tragically, Anne died in the typhus epidemic at Bergen-Belsen soon after their reunion. Nanette found herself alone again.

Nanette managed to survive the war in Bergen-Belsen. After liberation, she stayed in hospitals and sanatoriums for three years while she recovered from starvation, typhus, and tuberculosis.

She married and moved to Brazil with her new husband and had three children. During the Holocaust, Inge and her parents were sent to Terezin.

There they endured horrific conditions and the constant threat of deportation. Both girls survived unimaginable terror, constant hunger, unspeakable living conditions, and the loss of family members.

Both also contracted serious illnesses, including tuberculosis, during their time in the camps. Incredibly, these young girls survived, and after the war, they emigrated to the United States with their families.

They thrived in America and ultimately collaborated on this book to share their incredible stories with the world.

The little-known story of Fredy Hirsch, a German-Jewish youth leader and athlete, has recently gotten some attention in the media.

The Jewish news and culture magazine The Forward recently featured an in-depth article on this remarkable man. I was glad to see he is finally getting more of the recognition he deserves.

Being Jewish and gay made Fredy a prime target for the Nazis, yet he displayed remarkable courage in confronting them.

Read on to learn more about the story of Fredy Hirsch. Alfred Hirsch, known as Fredy, was born in and raised in Aachen, Germany.

In Aachen, he began his career as a teacher and educator in various Jewish youth organizations. An enthusiastic and talented athlete, Fredy also worked with Jewish sports associations.

After the Nazis came to power in Germany, he fled to Czechoslovakia, where he believed he would be safe. In , the Nazis marched into Czechoslovakia and began implementing laws against Jews.

Among the many laws, the Nazis forbade Jewish children from attending school, joining clubs and teams, and visiting public places.

When Fredy saw what was happening, he decided to do something about it. Using the Jewish-owned Hagibor sports complex in Prague as his base, Fredy arranged a wide variety of educational activities, classes, and sports programs for Jewish children.

Children who survived the war would remember the activities Hirsch arranged fondly, the gymnastics classes and soccer games which made their lives seem a little more normal and bearable.

He was also involved in Zionist causes and assisted in efforts to bring Jewish children to Palestine. When he was deported to Terezin in December , Fredy organized activities for the children there.

He used some grassy areas in Terezin as playing fields for sports games, including soccer and track and field events.

Fredy was described as athletic, attractive, and extremely caring. He made sure that the children kept themselves as clean as possible despite the lack of hot water and soap.

Survivors remember him as a very kind and reassuring presence to the children. Fredy also secured medical treatment for the children and removed some of them from transports to the East.

In September , Fredy and 5, other people were sent to Auschwitz. This transport was moved into an empty camp at Auschwitz called the Family Camp.

Fredy supervised the hundreds of children in the camp. He did everything he could to make life better for the children, even in the middle of Auschwitz.

Fredy actually managed to convince to SS to provide more food for the children and to treat them better.

But tragically, Fredy was unable to save the children or himself in the end. In March , all the children who arrived on the September transport were murdered by the Nazis.

Fredy also died at Auschwitz, but it is unclear if he died with the children. What ultimately happened to Fredy may never be known, but we do know about all he did for Jewish children in Prague, Terezin, and Auschwitz.

To learn more about Fredy, I highly recommend you read the feature article on him in the Forward. While there are plenty of Holocaust teaching resources for middle school students, teaching the Holocaust to this age group is still very challenging.

How do you make the Holocaust relevant to them? And what are some ways to guide them through this incredibly upsetting subject?

This incredible project uses the arts to educate students about the dangers of intolerance. It makes the Holocaust accessible to children, and presents the subject matter in a way that is poignant but not overly graphic or frightening.

The way it works is as follows: schools order kits containing ceramic butterflies, painting supplies, and cards with biographies of children who died in the Holocaust.

After learning more about the children, each student receives a butterfly to paint in memory of them.

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